Alice Through the Looking Glass Review: A Depp in the Wrong Direction


Director: James Bobin

Writers: Linda Woolverton (screenplay), Lewis Carroll (novel)

Stars: Mia Wasikowska, Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter, Anne Hathaway

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Release date: May 27th, 2016

Distributor: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Country: USA

Running time: 113 minutes


2/5

Best part: Sacha Baron Cohen.

Worst part: Johnny Depp.

A-lister extraordinaire Johnny Depp has had, even by his standards, a bizarre past twelve months. On top of hilarious run-ins with foreign governments, the actor was forced to confront his mother’s passing, a costly divorce to Amber Heard, allegations of domestic abuse, a dwindling worldwide fanbase, and a string of critical and commercial flops. His latest misadventure, Alice Through the Looking Glass, has done nothing to part the dark clouds hanging over his current predicament.

In amongst misfires like The Lone Ranger, Transcendence, The Tourist, Dark Shadows, and Mortdecai, 2010’s woeful Alice in Wonderland and its sequel add to the actor’s ever-growing list of crushing cinematic hiccups. Part of 2016’s collection of sequels nobody asked for, this installment continues ‘acclaimed’ filmmaker Tim Burton’s bright, shiny, unwarranted vision. This time around, Alice (Mia Wasikowska) is an accomplished ship captain coming home after over a year on the high seas. Cast out by her bitter ex-fiance (Leo Bill), she falls back into Underland with a thud. With help from the White Queen (Anne Hathaway), Absolem (Alan Rickman), Cheshire Cat (Stephen Fry), White Rabbit (Michael Sheen), Bloodhound (Timothy Spall) and Tweedledum and Tweedledee (Matt Lucas) among others, Alice seek to cure the Mad Hatter(Johnny Depp)’s sadness.

Alice Through the Looking Glass is an unnecessary and underwhelming homage to Alice in Wonderland‘s legacy. Based very loosely on Lewis Carroll’s seminal works, the movie delivers few original ideas or twists. Plot-points including the Hatter’s long-lost family and the Red Queen’s backstory fail to justify this sequel’s existence. Although covered in Burton’s grimy fingerprints, director James Bobin (The Muppets) is left to pick up the scraps. This time around, the Red Queen (Helena Bonham Carter) returns from exile with a new antagonist – Time himself (Sacha Baron Cohen). So that’s…something. Despite said talented cast and crew, everything about this production – From the typecasting to its overwhelming reliance of style over substance –  comes off as pure self-indulgence.

Alice Through the Looking Glass haphazardly toys with several intriguing ideasTime’s dungeon-like domain is operated with textbook precision. Each person’s soul is encapsulated by a stopwatch, with human life determined by Time’s current mood. Leaping between his own motivations and Underland’s well-being, the character – supported by Cohen’s Werner Herzog/Arnold Schwarzenegger impression – provides a welcome spark of life. Sadly, the movie delivers a mind-numbing assault on the senses. Packed with unconvincing green-screen vistas and brash CGI characters, the experience is more tiresome than entertaining. In this day and age, over-the-top performances from Depp, Carter, and Hathaway are no longer interesting. Meanwhile, talented actors including Rhys Ifans, Lindsay Duncan, and Geraldine James are underutilised.

Like many of 2016’s new releases, this fantasy-adventure reeks of sequelitis’ unbearable stench. Dragging a talented cast and crew through the mud, the uninspired direction and leaden screenplay make this yet another strike against Depp’s once-glowing reputation.

Verdict: A useless, mind-numbing sequel.

Crimson Peak Audio Review: (Slight) Bump in the Night


Director: Guillermo del Toro

Writers: Guillermo del Toro, Matthew Robbins

Stars: Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston, Jessica Chastain, Charlie Hunnam

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Release date: October 16th, 2015

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Country: USA

Running time: 119 minutes


 

3/5

Review:

Maps to the Stars Review – Hollyood Horror Story


Director: David Cronenberg

Writer: Bruce Wagner

Stars: Julianne Moore, Mia Wasikowska, John Cusack, Robert Pattinson


Release date: September 26th, 2014

Distributors: Entertainment One, Focus World

Countries: USA, Canada

Running time: 112 minutes


 

4/5

Best part: Cronenberg’s direction.

Worst part: The dodgy CGI.

Certainly, the sunny labyrinth of Los Angeles – sheltered by the Hollywood sign and supported by the Walk of Fame – wields many sights worth exploring. Indeed, anyone living outside the City of Angels has an idea of what’s on offer. As the hub of commercial entertainment, us Westerners rely on Hollywood to keep us engaged and relaxed. However, those who live in or have visited the landmark town know its many filthy secrets. Every inch of LA, from Compton to Santa Monica to Hollywood and Sunset Boulevards, is covered in a layer of scum. This is reflected in Tinseltown’s latest bout of self-deprecation, Maps to the Stars.

Julianne Moore & Mia Wasikowska.

With Maps to the Stars, a big-name director, commendable screenwriter, and several A-listers got together to kickstart the project. Despite the cast and crew’s immense buying power, this satirical-drama holds up on its own. Combating all forms of criticism, it’s difficult not to applaud the movie’s raw pride. This crime-thriller, taking on everything and everyone around it, breaks off into several valuable strands. Its narrative follows the Weiss family’s peculiar lifestyle. As one of (fictional) Hollywood’s most prestigious and ballsy families, the Weiss’ represent the archetypal Beverly Hills dynasty. The husband/father figure, Dr. Stafford Weiss (John Cusack), is a gutsy self-help guru/psychotherapist making his fortune from TV appearances and manuals. Obsessed with book tours and reputations, Stafford turns away from chaos and despair. The wife/mother figure, Cristina (Olivia Williams), is her thirteen-year-old son’s manic-depressive manager. Suffocating her child with pills and diet plans, her fragile frame of mind threatens to hurriedly destroy everything in her radius. The aforementioned son, Benjie (Evan Bird), is a mega-successful sitcom star bouncing back from a recent stint in a drug rehabilitation program. At the worst time possible, the daughter, Agatha (Mia Wasikowska), leaves a Floridian sanatorium to reconnect with her family.

John Cusack & Evan Bird.

John Cusack & Evan Bird.

Why was Agatha situated so far away from her family? What happened to the family before we met them, exactly?  Why is she covered in horrific scars? I can’t tell anyone, as it would ruin Maps to the Stars‘ immense enjoyment factor. Inhaling The Shining, Sunset Boulevard, American Beauty, and Mulholland Drive, the movie fuses self-reflexive humour with confronting drama-thriller tropes. From the first frame onwards, writer Bruce Wagner – apparently on a hell-bent mission to skewer Tinseltown left, right, and centre – outlines his viewpoints and ideologies for the audience. In doing so, Wagner – basing his screenplay on his experiences whilst comparing it to Paul Eluard’s poem ‘Liberte’ – allows us to shape our own analyses. Adding obvious titbits to each line, Wagner illuminates the puzzle pieces throughout. The narrative, pieced together in varying ways depending on one’s knowledge of the industry, comments on modern showbiz’s pros and cons. Examining Hollywood’s cynical business decisions and shallow inhabitants, the narrative evenly spreads itself over several intriguing plot-strands and character arcs. Despite the compelling   material, Maps to the Stars never establishes a lead character. Early on, Agatha worms her way into Beverly Hills through a friendship with limo driver/actor/writer Jerome Fontana (Robert Pattinson). Thanks to her Twitter-based attachment to Carrie Fisher, this bizarre character becomes ageing actress/sexual abuse victim Havana Segrand(Julianne Moore)’s “chore whore” (personal assistant). Havana longs for a remake of a feature originally starring her deceased mother (Sarah Gadon). This satirical-drama, giving its characters many physical, spiritual, and psychological afflictions, waits for its subjects to unravel like a faux-Gucci outfit.

“On the stairs of death I write your name, Liberty.” (Agatha Weiss (Mia Wasikowska), Maps to the Stars).

Robert Pattinson.

Robert Pattinson.

Flipping between plot-strands, this psychological-thriller relies on its severe, agenda-setting methodology. Despite Wagner’s piercing dialogue and searing commentary, credit belongs to renowned  Canadian director David Cronenberg (Videodrome, The Fly) for keeping everything under the surface. With each passing second, the master filmmaker supports Wagner’s argument by examining at his overwhelming viewpoints. Eclipsing his anti-establishment bottle flick Cosmopolis, Cronenberg hits a nerve most avoid like the plague. Like his 2012 limo-set drama, his cold, distant direction matches the agenda at every turn. Despite the tonal inconsistency, the filmmaker leaps between sub-plots with ease and determination. Sending shivers down the spine, his style amplifies the disgusting things our characters say and do. Learning from experience, his direction throws us normal folk into the chaos. His studio meetings, filmed entirely in medium close-ups, comes off like interrogations. Grappling with temptation, obsession, and greed, Cronenberg’s visual flourishes amplify the intensity. Amplified by Howard Shore’s piercing drum-lines and Peter Suschitzky’s mesmerising cinematography, the movie’s many climaxes and revelations hit like rejections. Unlike his more recent efforts (A History of Violence, A Dangerous Method), Cronenberg’s touch, like plastic surgery, rests on and under the surface. Tearing down egos and backstabbers, our talented performers capture a soap opera-like aura impeccably. Moore examines her searing role with gusto and vigour. Meddling with a despicable character (celebrating after a fellow actress drops out of a role due to tragic circumstances), she strips everything down to the bare essentials.

Within Hollywood’s bright lights, gorgeous landmarks, and raging parties, a disease – turning fame and fortune into despicable traits – seeks to destroy everything. Causing LA’s dirt-covered veneer, this scourge of reality TV and tabloid media has severely degraded the glamour. Despite the overbearing agenda, Maps to the Stars has the cojones to bludgen Hollywood with its own golden statuettes. Thanks to scintillating performances, pithy dialogue, and kinetic visuals, this satirical-drama is Cronenberg’s best effort since Eastern Promises.

Verdict: A compelling and confronting satirical-drama.

Only Lovers Left Alive Review – Nasty Bites


Director: Jim Jarmusch 

Writer: Jim Jarmusch 

Stars: Tilda Swinton, Tom Hiddleston, Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt

Only-Lovers-Left-Alive-Australian-Poster-copy


 Release date: April 17th, 2014

Distributors: Sony Pictures Classics, Soda Pictures, Pandora Film Verleih

Countries: UK, Germany

Running time: 123 minutes


 

 

 

4/5

Best part: The eclectic performances.

Worst part: The wavering pace.

Here’s the thing about vampires: they suck! Admittedly, labelling a fictional entity like this is bashful and condescending. However, over the past few years, Hollywood has chewed up and spat out this bloodsucking creature. Though Twilight, Being Human, The Originals etc. don’t reach my demographic, they must be named and shamed for downplaying the vampire’s more dangerous and intelligent aspects. So who possibly can salvage the fanged beast? Thankfully, writer/director Jim Jarmusch (Dead Man, Ghost Dog) has taken the vampire lore back to its sickeningly dark beginnings. His latest feature, Only Lovers Left Alive, crafts an insightful and purposeful tale of two vampires on the edge of expiration.

Tilda Swinton & Tom Hiddleston.

In no way intended for the common target demographic, Only Lovers Left Alive  reinterprets vampiric mythology and human existence. Here, Jarmusch subjects fans and newcomers to a nightmarish and transcendent ordeal. Those who label themselves “Team Edward” or “Team Jacob” won’t, most likely, ever label themselves “Team Jarmusch”. Thankfully, the movie elevates itself beyond those dismal heights. In fact, Jarmusch, in any context, would hate for his efforts to be compared to anything related to pop-culture or escapism. Only Lovers Left Alive throws the severity of everything, including its threatening title, into question. From the opening frame, we are introduced to a twisted and delicious love story. Living a minimalist lifestyle in Tangier, vampiric temptress Eve (Tilda Swinton) exists in a lonely and pervasive society. Collecting blood samples from fellow bloodsucker Christopher Marlowe (John Hurt), Eve longs for a more distinctive and ambitious lifestyle. In the other side of the globe – Detroit, to be exact – Adam (Tom Hiddleston) is a lonely and sullen rock ‘n’ roll icon. Hiding in his dilapidated two-story abode, Adam’s long-term notoriety hurls him into cult-icon territory. Ordering charismatic servant Ian (Anton Yelchin) to do his bidding, Adam’s suicidal tendencies throw his ideologies into chaos. His life, distorted by Eve’s arrival, is further tested by Eve’s promiscuous and enthusiastic sister-in-law Ava (Mia Wasikowska).

Mia Wasikowska & Anton Yelchin.

Written and directed by Jarmusch, this established auteur’s latest effort is a kitsch, listless, and tempered examination of its peculiar characters. These vampiric characters exist in a nonsensical and churlish version of the 21st century. Looking through the hourglass, Jarmusch and his creations lurch artistically toward the impactful finale. Today, rushed pacing and established tonal shifts infect genre cinema. Fortunately, this poetic filmmaker goes above and beyond the norm. Dextrously, the devil (or Dracula, in this case) is in the details. The narrative comes together via a labyrinthine structure of idiosyncrasies, existential moments, and visceral flourishes. Adam and Eve – commenting on humanity’s desire for conflict, wealth, and power – look down upon the surrounding “zombies”. Limiting our race to this derogatory title, Jarmusch and his characters seemingly share the same consciousness. Despite its aimless structure, several gem-like surprises reside within witty lines, shocking twists, and gloriously thrilling montages. Delivering a momentous series of set pieces, the narrative places us in the same room as these terrifying nightwalkers. Waxing philosophical about history, mythology, literature, cantankerous human tendencies, and emotions, Adam and Eve’s journey becomes a saucy and concentrated concoction to be slowly sipped on like a Bloody Mary (a drink downed more than once by our protagonists).

“I just feel like all the sand is at the bottom of the hour glass or something.” (Adam (Tom Hiddleston), Only Lovers Left Alive).

John Hurt.

Delivering an Ann-Rice-like tinge, Jarmusch and his favourable cast relish in this genre’s more chilling and impressionistic conceits. Illuminating its characters’ stranglehold on pop-culture, Only Lovers Left Alive becomes as desirable and ambitious as Adam and Eve themselves. Throughout this tumultuous romantic-drama, these immortal beings deliberate on even their own artistic merits. However, delivering overbearing viewpoints on intrinsic topics, Jarmusch’s seminal words and ideas almost overpower his magnetic direction. His agenda, commenting on psychological and societal degradation, undermines this otherwise subtle and heart-wrenching character study. Fortunately, the talented and vivacious cast awaken these gritty, soulless figures. Swinton, once again, steps gracefully through this filmmaker’s universe. Her performance, defined by purposeful mannerisms and a silky-smooth voice, delves fang-first into the material. In addition, Hiddleston and Wasikowska deliver electrifying turns as the story’s more polarising characters. Graciously, Jarmusch’s visual style turns even the most dialogue driven scenes into sensory feasts. Dousing each frame in a pulsating colour palette, Yorick Le Saux’s cinematography lends inspired tones and patterns to this all-encompassing and alarming journey. In addition, with our scarred lovers obsessed with revelatory artistic endeavours, the movie’s bright, bold soundtrack/score delivers pleasurable interludes that breathe life into this meticulous creation.

Drifting beyond its glacial pace and stoic narrative, Only Lovers Left Alive elevates its vampiric characters above those of recent cinematic iterations. Fuelled by existential angst, scintillating romantic interludes, and Jarmusch’s sensuous visuals, this movie examines our infatuation with nostalgia, gothic fiction, and the First World order. Jarmusch, as valuable to the narrative as Hiddleston’s skinny physique, examines yet another genre and delivers an idiosyncratic, intensifying, and indulgent work of art. As expected, this indie darling becomes a vampiric love story with…bite.

Verdict: A moody and electrifying romantic-drama. 

Stoker Review – Hitchcock Homage


Director: Park Chan-wook

Writer: Wentworth Miller 

Stars: Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Matthew Goode, Dermot Mulroney


Release date: March 1st, 2013

Distributor: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Countries: USA, UK 

Running time: 99 minutes


 

4½/5

Best part: Chan-wook’s direction.

Worst part: The cartoonish supporting characters.

In the first few scenes of psychological thriller Stoker, we are brought into a strange, spooky yet beguiling world. The audience is whisked through the woods as we come across one symbol and titbit after another. This technique develops one of many beautifully crafted sequences in this discomforting visual and intellectual splendour. Stoker sticks with you and never lets go whilst giving us one of 2013’s most enterprising narratives.

Mia Wasikowska.

Stoker is a creepily effective and moody assault on the mind and senses. Despite its minor inconsistencies, the movie sweeps you up in a visceral and gothic thrill-ride that would make Tim Burton and Stanley Kubrick blush then pass out. This gothic thriller starts off with a crippling tragedy befalling the Stoker household. India Stoker(Mia Wasikowska)’s 18th birthday celebrations turn sour when her father Richard (Dermot Mulroney) is killed in a car accident. Her birthday then transitions into his funeral, as India and her mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman) quickly realise that Richard was the glue that held their family together. Their time to grieve is also hurriedly interrupted by Richard’s charming younger brother Charlie (Matthew Goode). Charlie’s stay is met with a bevy of kooky supporting characters trapped inside India’s existence (including her concerned great aunt Gwendolyn (Jacki Weaver)), a slew of murders within the neighbouring town, and India’s mental, spiritual, and sexual transformations. Teenagers, huh?

Nicole Kidman.

South Korean director Park Chan-wook (OldboyThirst) is one of world cinema’s most acclaimed directors. His movies thrust themselves into your consciousness and irritably crawl under your skin. His distinct imagery and darkly comedic touches push the boundaries of modern crime/thriller cinema. Before Stoker was released, I was praying that Hollywood wouldn’t treat Chan-wook with the same distain and idiocy it treats other big-name foreign filmmakers. Thankfully, he is able to apply is distressing style to this Hitchcockian drama. His storytelling prowess and idiosyncrasies push this dour story along at a controlled pace. If you have seen Oldboy (soon to be ‘blessed’ with a Hollywood remake), you would already be aware of Chan-wook’s fascination with family ties, the bitterness of existence, and the power of revenge. Here, his story and character ticks are brought up in an effervescent and tangible fashion. His purposeful direction elevates Prison Break lead actor Wentworth Miller’s intriguing yet conventional script. Miller’s first big-budget screenplay leans too heavily on many of Hitchcock’s seminal horror flicks (Shadow of a Doubt, in particular). Thanks to a love of Hitchcock’s efforts, I could easily predict many twists and turns within this confronting story. This movie also takes a while to get going. This aspect, though beguiling, may turn some people away from Chan-wook’s influential material. However, this story contains more emotional resonance than anything you would have witnessed on the big screen in the past few months. Its alienating tone grated my nerves before I became increasingly intrigued. This seemingly pristine horror-thriller gleefully looks into the literal, metaphorical, incestuous, and Freudian shades of life.

Matthew Goode.

Featuring an array of sickly dark and light-hearted overtones, the narrative places a magnifying glass upon the ‘release’ of India’s inner demons. Stoker, featuring elements of Night of the Hunter, is a paranoia inducing examination of sanity, sensation, manipulation, and human connection. The movie continually transitions from kookily charming to gut-wrenchingly vile – turning into an ‘Addam’s Family meets American Beauty‘ style drama. The movie’s overt sexuality and infatuation with carnal desires are summed up in several enthralling sequences. A piano sequence featuring India and Charlie turns into a battle of brains, wits, and bulges. Here, the devil is in the details. Chan-wook’s style is immaculately plastered across the screen and spliced within each intricate frame. The applaudable craftsmanship is on par with Kubrick at his most alarming. His aesthetic ticks take the ‘conventional’ and turn it upside-down and inside out. His moody, atmospheric style builds every scene into a meticulous work of art. His fascinating editing techniques, in particular, are handled with care. One transition, in which brushed hair transforms into a field of tall grass, is simply jaw-dropping. Chan-wook’s methodical style is also applied to the sound design and cinematography. His eye for voyeuristic camera angles and movements pushes this narrative along at a refreshing click. Stoker is drowned in illusions and imaginative compositions. In fact, each plot point reaches a tension inducing and unique crescendo (throughout the second act, in particular). Every sound effect is burned into your skull like a lobotomy scar (a fitting description for this unnerving thriller). Crackling eggshells, gunshots, and the whistling wind will make you shift in your seat.

“He used to say: “sometimes you need to do something bad to stop you from doing something worse.”” (India Stoker (Mia Wasikowska), Stoker).

Family values…

Thankfully, Chan-wook’s world isn’t developed this way for the sake of quirky aesthetic choices. His creation depicts parallels between puberty, independence, and masochism. Stoker‘s world is also a peculiar concoction of contrasting time periods. The Stokers live in a 1940s mansion fit with winding passages, creaking staircases, and bold colours. However, the Carrie-esque high school scenes contain many aesthetic idiosyncrasies reminiscent of 70s and present day settings. I’m not sure what Chan-wook is trying to say with this technique, but I still fell for Stoker‘s warped and precious universe. Stoker’s polarising characters also boost this studious look at the pheromonal and delusional mind. These people, reacting in vastly different ways to a major loss, are bafflingly and suspiciously vacant. India is a fascinating and vicious character ripped straight from Chan-wook’s previous efforts. Finding her way in life whilst coming to terms with death, destruction, and the opposite sex, she becomes a powerful force throughout this distorted coming-of-age drama. Credit goes to Wasikowska for persevering through the character’s many awkward and irritating transitions. India’s breakthrough moments, including the murder/’long shower’ sequence, chronicle Wasikowska’s immense talent. Kidman, thanks mostly to her “I can’t wait to watch life tare you apart” speech, conquers her minor yet profound role. Goode’s commanding screen presence pays off when required as his character’s menacing persona scintillates. Unfortunately, Weaver, Lucas Till and Alden Ehrenreich are given laughably one dimensional roles.

Despite the lack of Vampire lore and supernatural elements (given the title’s cultural relevance), Stoker is a moody, dour, and enthralling horror-thriller. Avoiding Hollywood’s ‘typical’ treatment of foreign directors, Chan-wook has crafted a movie that keeps you on the edge of your seat from the enrapturing prologue to the polarising epilogue.

Verdict: A moody, dark, and affecting psychological thriller.

Lawless Review – Blood-stained Blokes


Director: John Hillcoat

Writer: Nick Cave (screenplay), Matt Bondurant (book)

Stars: Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy, Guy Pearce, Gary Oldman


Release date: August 29th, 2012

Distributors: The Weinstein Company, FilmNation Entertainment 

Country: USA

Running time: 115 minutes


3½/5

Best part: Guy Pearce’s creepy turn.

Worst part: The unbalanced narrative.

The prohibition era gangster film has always been a popular movement in modern cinema. Despite their period piece settings, films such as Miller’s Crossing, Public Enemies and O Brother, Where Art Thou? (comedic example) have brought the genre into the contemporary filmmaking era with dashes of wit and violence. The latest presentation of 1930’s gangster life, Lawless, is a gritty, authentic yet confused retrospective of the infamous Bondurant brothers. Continuing the current trend of prohibition-era crime drama, born from HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, Lawless is a pulpy, visceral yet profound lesson in gangster lore.

Shia LaBeouf & Mia Wasikowska.

Shia LaBeouf & Mia Wasikowska.

The Bondurant brothers were supposedly immortal moonshine makers and runners, situated in the hills outside of a crime-ridden Chicago. With Al Capone and other dangerous men ruling the city, the Bondurants were in charge if the regional distribution of illegal alcoholic substances. Forrest (Tom Hardy) and Howard Bondurant (Jason Clark) are two of the most notoriously violent citizens of a broken United States. The youngest brother Jack (Shia LaBeouf) wants to be just like them, trying anything to prove his worth to his older siblings. Their control of the countryside is interrupted however by the introduction of Special Deputy Charlie Rakes (Guy Pearce), determined to destroy every drop from their distillery. Along with an alluring new bartender (Jessica Chastain), the brothers fight to keep their reputations alive and the dirty cops at bay.

Tom Hardy.

Tom Hardy.

The film successfully combines old and new Hollywood-style crime genre conventions. The strong, straight edged characters are brought to life with every gun shot, punch and stab, containing a loud ring to effectively depict every brutal act in this vile conflict. The third film by Australian director John Hillcoat (The Proposition, The Road) is a dirty and hauntingly authentic look at so-called true events. The story of the Bondurant brothers is presented from Jack’s point of view. Unfortunately, this narrow presentation of gangster life and family bonds in the southern districts of America only focuses on the exploits behind Jack’s one dimensional goals. His eagerness to join the running and distilling business leaves little development for the other, more intriguing characters in this meaty story. Despite his character’s naive and occasionally banal nature, LaBeouf puts in a revelatory performance that could hopefully lift his controversial career. The other characters in this enthralling saga are performed convincingly despite the lack of development. Tom Hardy, continuing his promising year after breathtaking performances in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and The Dark Knight Rises, creates a loyal yet remorseless interpretation of the gangster who lives on his own terms. Despite his nearly inaudible southern drawl, Hardy’s physical presence and piercing stare creates a fierce leader with a slight vulnerable side. Also enrapturing in their small roles are the ubiquitous Jessica Chastain, Dane DeHaan, Noah Taylor, Mia Wasikowska as Jack’s love interest Bertha and Gary Oldman as influential outlaw Floyd Banner.

“It is not the violence that sets men apart, alright, it is the distance that he is prepared to go.” (Forrest Bondurant (Tom Hardy), Lawless).

Guy Pearce.

Guy Pearce.

This adaptation of the novel The Wettest County in the World by descendant Matt Bondurant succeeds in creating a darkly rich re-creation of 30’s America. Influenced by prolific crime directors such as the Coen Brothers, Brian De Palma and Michael Mann, Hillcoat efficiently emphasises the earthy and unflattering tones of every bar, dirt road and blood stained room in this era of temptation and cruel violence. Silhouettes and low lighting also effectively capture the depths these characters have fallen into, while the authentic Virginian setting depicts a southern community quickly falling to the evolving landscape of a changing century. The film continues Hillcoat and screenwriter Nick Cave’s flair for punishingly affecting violence and torture sequences. Matching the whipping scenes of Australian western The Proposition and cannibalism in The Road, Lawless lives up to its name and the characters live up to their frightening reputations. Blood splatters all over the walls, gun fights and punch ups are handled with a shocking level of detail, creating many uncomfortable and even blackly comedic moments. Much of the violence and wit is convincingly handled through a passionate performance by Australian actor Guy Pearce. Rakes lashes out at the Bondurant Brothers with a strong distaste for their freedoms and practises. Creating one of the most disgusting yet pampered characters since Alex in A Clockwork Orange, his relentless nature, snarly accent and unique mannerisms create a truly threatening interpretation of the dirty detective character.

Bolstered by Boardwalk Empire’s immense success, Lawless is the latest effort to hop on the cinematic anti-hero wave. Thanks to Cave’s prose and Hillcoat’s style, this gangster flick sucks the stills dry and never lets up!

Verdict: An unfocused yet engaging gangster flick.